Menu
Christ Church Greyfriars
@
Newgate Street
The City EC1A 7AF
www.cityoflondon.gov.uk

Christ Church Greyfriars

Last updated October 23rd, 2021

Newgate Street
The City EC1A 7AF

Opening Times

Note: Owing to temporary closures the times below may not accurately reflect current opening hours.

MON
00:00 - 00:00
TUE
00:00 - 00:00
WED
00:00 - 00:00
THU
00:00 - 00:00
FRI
00:00 - 00:00
SAT
00:00 - 00:00
SUN
00:00 - 00:00

Nearby Tourist Attractions

Sort by distance from:
  1. Old Bailey

    The Old Bailey, or to use the correct name, The Central Criminal Court, was built in 1907 on top of the site of the Old Newgate Prison. It was designed by Edward Mountford. Many famous criminals from various time periods have been tried here, including Jack The Ripper and Jeffrey Archer. Visitors are welcome to view most trials from the public galleries, although children under 14 are not permitted. Admission is free.

  2. St. Paul’s Cathedral

    St. Paul’s Cathedral is perhaps one of London’s most famous cathedrals. Full of many historical events, the admission fee covers the entrance to the Crypt, Ambulatory and Whispering Gallery. In addition to this, St. Dunstan’s Chapel is available for private prayer. Admission fees apply and concessions are available. Phone for details. Closed for sightseeing 24th, 25th and 31st December. Guide dogs are accepted.

  3. Clerks’ Well

    Clerk’s Well was the setting of many plays performed by the Parish Clerk’s of London, thought to be established in 1174. For many years, the exact location wasn’t known due to it being situated within the basement of a building in Ray Street – now known as Farringdon Street. It was rediscovered in 1924 during building works along Farringdon Lane. After a full renovation Clerk’s Well now has a full history of the well and it’s place within medieval times for all to read and learn from.

  4. Southwark Cathedral

    Southwark Cathedral was built in the 13th and 14th centuries as the Augustinian Priory Church of St Mary Overie. The church was then given Cathedral status in 1905. The cathedral contains many monuments including a 13th century effigy of a knight, the memorial of the marchioness pleasure boat, the poet John Gower, and possibly the most popular is William Shakespeare who lived and died in the Southwark area.

  5. Wesley’s House & Chapel

    Built in 1778, Wesley’s House, Chapel & Museum was formally the home of John Wesley – founder of the Methodist faith. The house has been reconstructed to emanate its Georgian interior and the cemetery is where Wesley was laid to rest. Admission is free, but donations are warmly welcomed.

  6. The Monument

    The Monument was erected in remembrance of The Great Fire of London in 1666 which started in a bakery on Pudding Lane. It is the tallest isolated column in the world and with its winding staircase of 311 steps which takes you to the top platform, the view of London is truly breathtaking.